26.2 miles is daunting.  But a 4-person relay isn’t.  I need to be ready to run 6-7 miles by the end of May.  I can do this.  While I’m not ready yet, I will be. I have the support, the time, and a mutual goal that will get me there.

I’ve watched a number of friends train and run marathons, and I’m always inspired.  But I’m also intimidated by the number of miles, the time and dedication to running I would need to commit to in order to be ready for this distance.  I’ve conquered 13.1, but I think that is the farthest I want to go. It was achievable for me. I started small, built up my miles, participated in a 10 mile race, so 13.1 didn’t seem that much farther.  But it was. Those 3 miles made all the difference. They were rough, but I made it.  And the feeling of accomplishment was amazing!  It makes you almost forget those last 3 miles.

I need to remind myself of the goals that are set for students and teachers.  Are they achievable, yet stretches them just enough that they can see their hard work pay off? Not all are marathon runners. Some excel at 13.1, others at even shorter distances.  This makes me wonder…

Do I provide enough scaffolding for students and teachers when the task before them seems daunting?  Reading a chapter book, completing a multiplication story problem, launching a new curriculum…what steps do I take to help them reach that goal?  Am I underestimating how challenging these tasks can be for some?  Do I acknowledge the pain, the frustration, when the end seems so far away, and do I celebrate the accomplishment well enough so that when looking back the frustration didn’t seem so bad?  While I think I offer support, I’m not sure I offer it in the progressive manner that leads to success. I wonder if I provide enough time or sequential structure, and if I leave students and teachers in a place of frustration and expect them to move on before feeling accomplished.

So I need to start with the relay.  I need to be sure I understand the efforts behind each student or teacher’s goal.  And then getting to the 26.2 may not seem as daunting…

 

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